94 Siamese Cats Found Locked Up In Tiny Singapore Apartment

By Amanda Froelich Truth Theory

After receiving numerous complaints that foul odors were coming from a woman’s two-bedroom apartment in Singapore, authorities finally checked out the abode and discovered something horrific. 94 siamese cats had been locked in the tiny apartment, many of which were sick or dying from lack of care.

Immediately, housing authorities contacted the Cat Welfare Society in Singapore. Maychoo Ling, an independent cat rescuer who works closely with the organization, was also asked to assist with the rescue.

Ling, who has been rescuing cats for 14 years, told The Dodo that she had dealt with a lot of hoarding cases before. This most recent rescue, however, was the first time she’d seen so many cats stepping over each other in such a small apartment.

“The stench was unbearable,” Ling said. “Pee and poop was not cleaned up. They were seen being fed with kibbles on the soiled floor instead of bowls. Unclean shower pails were used as their water bowls. It was just so filthy and messy.”

It was later determined that the woman who was keeping the cats (most of which were Siamese) did so to breed and sell them, even though she didn’t have a license to do so. Even if the woman did get around to posting the cats for sale, she wouldn’t have made much progress. Most were too sick and nearly all required medical assistance.

“Their fur was very sticky,” said Ling. “Some had the flu. Some had only an eye with the other one blind with infection and filled with pus. One had open wounds with maggots. Those long-fur ones were severely matted. Most were caked with poop.”

To make matters worse, none of the animals were spayed or neutered, which is likely why there were so many in the apartment.

One of the cats rescued was a mother to five kittens. Though she was attempting to nurse them, little to no milk was coming out because she was so malnourished. Sadly, one of the kittens died soon after being rescued.

Because some cats were friendly whereas others were more feral, it was a task to move all the felines to a shelter where they will be receiving medical care. “We had to be patient and calm them down before we picked them up to put into carriers,” Ling said. The most important thing, however, is that the task was accomplished.

Some of the cats remain in medical boarding while the healthier ones are now living at a cat kennel. Despite everything, most remain to be in good spirits.

“They seem much happier and have more spark in their eyes,” Ling said. “They are often seen kneading, which means they are happy and relaxed. These 94 cats have finally broken free from such a horrific life and are able to start a new journey.”

Read more: Why The FBI Now Categorizes Animal Cruelty As A Class A Felony

Images Credit: Saving The Siameses

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I am Luke Miller, content manager at Truth Theory and creator of Potential For Change. I like to blend psychology and spirituality to help you create more happiness in your life.Grab a copy of my free 33 Page Illustrated eBook- Psychology Meets Spirituality- Secrets To A Supercharged Life You Control Here

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