The Kennels At A Colorado Shelter Are All Empty After All Animals Got Adopted

By Anthony McLennan / Truth Theory

Animals at a Colorado shelter have benefited from human kindness in the midst of the coronavirus after they were all adopted.

At the Humane Society of the Pikes Peak Region (HSPPR), the usual sounds of barking and meowing have given way to an unfamiliar silence.

This was after every single cat and dog at the HSPPR shelter had been adopted.

“Empty Dog Kennels!” the organization wrote on its Facebook page.

“That’s right, Colorado Springs. You did it again! We emptied out our Cat Adoption Center on Tuesday, and last night, we adopted out every dog in our available dog kennel!

“Amazing! Just look at all those empty kennels. We can’t thank you enough for helping us find homes for all these amazing pets during this difficult time!

Empty Dog Kennels!

That's right, Colorado Springs. You did it again! We emptied out our Cat Adoption Center on Tuesday, and last night, we adopted out every dog in our available dog kennel! Amazing! Just look at all those empty kennels. We can't thank you enough for helping us find homes for all these amazing pets during this difficult time! #HappyTailsHappyHearts #EmptyKennels #ItsAThingofBeauty

Gepostet von Humane Society of the Pikes Peak Region am Donnerstag, 26. März 2020

But it’s unfortunately not all good news in Colorado. The state has badly affected by the coronavirus – as of Sunday afternoon there were over 2300 confirmed cases and 47 deaths.

A state-wide stay-at-home order has been in effect since Thursday in an attempt to slow the spread of the coronavirus.

Read more: Blame Humans For Coronavirus Crisis, Not Animals, Says U.N Environment Boss

In the middle of such a crisis, it’s more remarkable that people have been welcoming adopted animals into their homes.

More adoptions across the U.S

And it’s not only in Colorado where people are adopting animals.

ASPCA animal foster programs in New York City and Los Angeles have reportedly experienced a nearly 70% adoption increase.

“[People] talk about having more time on their hands, wanting a distraction and to do some tangible good,” Tamela Terry, president of Maryland’s Humane Society just outside Washington DC, said.

The Humane Society of the U.S recently asked states to declare animal shelters essential services.

But some rescue centers have still had to shut down due to social distancing protocols.

Animals have also needed foster homes when their owners have become sick.

It will, therefore, be crucial that there are people willing to continue to adopt and foster animals.

IMAGE FEATURED: Jozef Polc

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