New Evidence Suggests Humans Could Have Entered Europe A Lot Earlier Than Previously Believed

By Jess Murray Truth Theory

A new study has just revealed that the belief that humans came from Africa millions of years ago might not be entirely true. The authors of the study have claimed that they discovered a footprint in Crete that could suggest that humans were actually in Europe a lot earlier than was previously believed.

The initial understanding has long been in place since fossils were found from our early ancestors in South and East Africa in the mid-20th century. Researchers then later discovered that further fossils that were found seemed to show that humans remained in Africa for millions of years before spreading out into Europe and Asia.

However, reports now state that a recently discovered footprint, which is believed to be from a human, and was made in Crete 5.7 millions years ago, now adds a whole new line of questioning to previous ancestry theories. This could mean that humans actually left the continent a lot earlier. Professor Per Ahlberg, who was an author on the study, said, “This discovery challenges the established narrative of early human evolution head-on and is likely to generate a lot of debate. Whether the human origins research community will accept fossil footprints as conclusive evidence of the presence of hominins in the Miocene of Crete remains to be seen.”

The conclusion that the print was from a human was reached after establishing many distinct characteristics, including a lack of claws on the toes, the fact that the subject walked on two feet, and the factor that the inner toes went out further than the outer ones, just like a human foot. These factors combined led to the conclusion that the print belonged to our early human ancestors. Reports have also further stated that the owner of the print could possibly have developed the same traits as those in Africa, but whilst in different places.

Mark Maslin from University College London told The Times that although this new discovery shows that our ancestors walked into modern Europe, Europe, the absence of evidence for later humans could suggest that the journey “may not have ended well”.

IMAGE CREDIT:1971yes / 123RF Stock Photo

I am Jess Murray, wildlife conservationist, photographer and writer. I like to document the natural world and create awareness through my writing so that your future can be sustainable and positive. Follow my Facebook page and Instagram account to be part of the journey.

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