This 3D Printed “Supercar” Is 90% lighter And More Durable Than Traditional Cars

By Jess Murray Truth Theory

The world’s first 3D printed car was shown off at the Los Angeles Auto Show last month.

The 3D printed Blade Supercar is made of a combination of aluminium and carbon fibre, and can accelerate to 60 miles per hour in just 2.2 seconds, with a 700 hp engine. The innovative vehicle is able to run with the use of gasoline or compressed natural gas.

The Supercar, which weighs 635 kg, debuted in June last year, showcasing the company’s original and environmentally-sustainable approach to the manufacturing process.

The process involves 3D printing aluminium nodes which are joined together by carbon fibre tubing, which is essentially like building with Lego blocks. This process is incredibly easy and straightforward, which means that even semi-skilled workers can work efficiently on the new cars.

The manufacturing approach, called Node, also requires less capital and fewer materials than a standard vehicle. The cars are also 90% lighter and more durable than traditional cars.

The manufacturer, Divergent 3D, aim to manufacture competitive vehicles, whilst at the same time completely changing the way that cars are produced by creating them in a way that is more environmentally friendly, compared to the current vehicles.

A standard car uses a lot of materials such as metals, plastics, rubbers and paints, all of which are harmful to the environment in the long process of their creation, as well as being shipped across the world, therefore meaning that it can be incredibly polluting on the planet just to create a car, before it is even driven.

In 2010, The Guardian reported that producing a medium-sized car can generate over 17 tonnes of greenhouse gases.

But with innovative ideas like the 3D printed car, the world is moving to a more sustainable planet in many industries, to help change the use of materials to those that are more environmentally friendly and sustainable.

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About The Author

Jess Murray is a wildlife filmmaker and conservation blogger, having recently returned from studying wildlife and conservation in South Africa, she is now striving to spread awareness about the truth behind faux conservation facilities throughout the world. You can follow Jess on Facebook Here

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